Hand Hygiene: Are You Part of the Solution or the Problem? Hand Hygiene: Are You Part of the Solution or the Problem?   The vast majority of the germs and/or bacteria that we collect each day is transferred through our hands. As we go about our day we use our hands to type, write, pick up phones, handle computer accessories, open doors, etc. Commonly we are either spreading these illness-causing microbes to commonly touched items, or we are picking them up from other people who have touched the surface prior to us. Now that our hands are loaded with potential viruses and infections, we then use them to scratch an itchy nose, put food into our mouths or shake a friends hand. We are all potential spreaders of illness. Luckily theres a fairly simple solution to this problem: proper hand hygiene practices. The CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) guidelines for CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) guidelines for hand washing...
The Most Important Thing You're Probably Not Doing Enough The Most Important Thing You're Probably Not Doing Enough Keeping a building or house clean and healthy takes a lot of work. We spend hours mopping tile floors, scrubbing sinks, tubs and toilets, deodorizing and disinfecting rooms from the ground up. Al...
The Difference between Sanitizing and Disinfecting, and When to Use Each The Difference between Sanitizing and Disinfecting, and When to Use Each   What we often consider to be "clean" is NOT a natural state. In order to maintain clean and healthy facilities, there must be a concerted effort to continually remove soils, bacteria and germs from all hard, non-porous surfaces. The reason we do this is two-fold: to improve the appearance of a facility and to remove harmful materials that are likely to cause illness. The term "clean" is generally used for the removal of visible dirt and dust from a surface. When it comes to removing potentially harmful materials there are two standards as recognized by the EPA: Sanitizing and Disinfecting. Although both methods involve improving the impact an area has on the health of the people in the space, there is a significant difference in the products and methods used for each operation.   To sanitize a surface means to greatly reduce or kill the existing bacteria on a surface in a relatively short period. This is most often practiced in food-prep settings where the presence of contaminants are relatively low, and where the use of disinfectants would be harmful to people. For instance, establishments that serve food are required by law to sanitize their plates, utensils, glasses, etc. The prescribed standard for sanitizing is to remove 99.9% of the bacteria on an object or surface that will come into contact with living beings. It is important to note that this does not account for the elimination of viruses or fungus. These products are often in ready-to-use form, and include products like Betcos Sanibet and NCLs Spritz.   Disinfection involves the use of a stronger solution designed to completely eliminate all bacteria, viruses and fungus from frequently touched surfaces and places where pathogens are likely to exist. The most obvious example is the use of disinfectants in hospitals and other health care facilities where bodily fluids are present. Please note that cleaning common soils is not a function of disinfection, which means that surfaces must be thoroughly cleaned before a disinfectant is effective. This is why disinfectant cleaners suchBetcos Sanibet...
Avoid Bitter, Lukewarm Coffee Avoid Bitter, Lukewarm Coffee There's nothing like a nice hot cup of Joe to start your day. Many of us rely on the boost that caffeinated coffee provides to get productive first thing in the morning. Others prefer de-caf., yet still need that first cup to officially kick off the work day. What often happens; however, is that over time, that first cup isn't as warm as it's always been. You may also start to notice that the coffee tastes more and more bitter. Both of these are very common, and are symptoms of the accumulation of mineral deposits and other pollutants in your commercial coffee brewer reservoir. Unless you are using filtered or purified water in your BUNN, or other popular commercial brewers, minerals such as iron and lime will encrust the heating element, making the coffee taste bitter and preventing it from heating as intended.   These issues can be avoided by routine maintenance and a process called de-liming. De-liming should be done every three to six months depending on the hardness of the water and the frequency of use. Most cleaning equipment repair departments will de-lime the entire brewer for a small fee while providing a loaner machine while you wait. You can clean it yourself without much trouble with just two components: Distilled White Vinegar and a De-Liming Spring. Start by unplugging the brewer and letting it cool off. With the decanter undBUNN...